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2 edition of Characterization of anaerobic benzene-degrading cultures found in the catalog.

Characterization of anaerobic benzene-degrading cultures

Anna Christine Ulrich

Characterization of anaerobic benzene-degrading cultures

by Anna Christine Ulrich

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Published .
Written in English


About the Edition

This dissertation describes several studies of anaerobic benzene degradation by microorganisms and fulfills four objectives. The first and second objectives were to characterize microbial populations in two benzene-degrading consortia (one methanogenic and one nitrate-reducing) on a physiological and molecular level. The shortest doubling times, 8 to 9 days, were observed in nitrate-reducing cultures. The highest substrate concentration utilized, 1000 muM, and maximum absolute rates of benzene degraded, 75 muM/day, were observed in methanogenic cultures. Five Bacterial 16S rRNA sequences, one of which resembled a clone previously found in a sulphate-reducing benzene-degrading culture, were identified in the methanogenic culture. Four Bacterial and no Archaeal 16S rRNA sequences were identified in the nitrate-reducing culture. One clone comprised 70% of the culture and was phylogenetically 93% similar to both Azoarcus and Dechloromonas species.The third objective was to isolate and characterize pure cultures capable of anaerobic benzene biodegradation. Two co-cultures called Dechloromonas co-culture (DCC) and Azoarcus co-culture (ACC) were successfully isolated from a nitrate-reducing enrichment culture. DCC is ∼99% Dechloromonas sp. and ∼1% an unidentified eubacterium clone. ACC is ∼98% Azoarcus sp. and ∼2% Pseudomonas sp. Both co-cultures were capable of anaerobic benzene, toluene and benzoate degradation under nitrate-reducing conditions. The isolated Pseudomonas sp. was capable of aerobic benzene degradation and hydrogen utilization under nitrate-reducing conditions. The isolated unidentified eubacterium clone did not exhibit growth on any of the substrates tested. The Dechloromonas and Azoarcus organisms are responsible for anaerobic benzene degradation.The fourth objective was to identify the key metabolic steps in the anaerobic benzene degradation pathways. 13C6-benzene experiments were conducted with the methanogenic and nitrate-reducing enrichments. Under methanogenic conditions a maximum of 8 muM 13C6-phenol and 3 muM 13C6-benzoate were detected. These results indicate that under methanogenic conditions a pathway where benzene undergoes hydroxylation to phenol and further transformation to benzoate exists. Under nitratereducing conditions a maximum of 90 nM 13C6-toluene, 120 nM 13C6-benzoate and no phenol were detected as intermediates of benzene degradation. This is the first evidence for a pathway where benzene undergoes methylation to toluene and further transformation to benzoate.

Edition Notes

Statementby Anna Christine Ulrich.
The Physical Object
Pagination197 leaves.
Number of Pages197
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19886930M
ISBN 100612942562

The addition of sulfate to an anaerobic petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which benzene was a major soluble contaminant resulted in removal of benzene from the groundwater. The loss in benzene was associated with a decrease in sulfate along the groundwater flow path, relative to a conservative bromide tracer. Studies with [C]acetate and molybdate demonstrated that sulfate reduction was the.   A bacterium, strain BC, was isolated from a benzene-degrading chlorate-reducing enrichment culture. Strain BC degrades benzene in conjunction with chlorate reduction. Cells of strain BC are short rods that are μm wide and 1 to 2 μm long, are motile, and stain gram negative. Strain BC grows on benzene and some other aromatic compounds with oxygen or in the absence of oxygen with Cited by:

Microbial community structure of methanogenic benzene-degrading cultures enriched from five different sediments. Mana Noguchi 1), Futoshi Kurisu 2), Yuji Sekiguchi 3), Ikuro Kasuga 4), Hiroaki Furumai 2) 1) Faculty of Natural System, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University 2) Research Center for Water Environment Technology Author: Mana Noguchi, Futoshi Kurisu, Yuji Sekiguchi, Ikuro Kasuga, Hiroaki Furumai. The optimal physiological conditions for anaerobic benzene-degrading bacteria and the biodegradation pathways are still largely unclear (6, 8, 17, 26, 33, 48). The relatively high solubility of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (the so-called BTEX compounds) and the low solubility of oxygen often result in BTEX contamination in anoxic.

Pure cultures of anaerobic organisms that can degrade hydrocar-bons such as toluene, hexadecane and naphthalene have now been described17– However, organisms capable of anaerobic benzene degradation have been elusive and this metabolism was observed only in sediment studies2–6,9,15,16 or with microbial enrichments1,7,8, No single microbial species had been shown to degrade completely the compound under anaerobic conditions, although stable benzene-degrading enrichment cultures were known. Toluene-degrading organisms, however, had been identified, and included members of the nitrate-reducing genera Azoarcus and Thauera, and the iron-reducing Geobacter Cited by:


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Characterization of anaerobic benzene-degrading cultures by Anna Christine Ulrich Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nevertheless, within the last 15 years, several benzene‐degrading cultures have been enriched under varying electron acceptor conditions in laboratories around the world, and organisms involved in anaerobic benzene degradation have been identified, indicating that anaerobic benzene degradation is a relevant environmental by: characterization of anaerobic benzene-degrading cultures.

benzene-degrading cultures (per vial) from experiment 84 table summary of mass balances inni1rate-reducing enriched table benzene biodegradation in nitrate-amended microcosms andAuthor: Siobhan Burland. Physiological and molecular characterization of anaerobic benzene‐degrading mixed cultures.

Ania C. Ulrich. Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5, Canada. Search for more papers by this author. Anaerobic benzene-degrading enrichment cultures performing methanogenesis were obtained from non-contaminated lotus field soil.

Stable isotope probing with 13 C benzene was used to detect the bacteria that were involved in benzene degradation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of fractionated samples exhibited an obvious shift of some DGGE bands to a heavier DNA by:   In contrast to anaerobic toluene degradation, only four organisms capable of anaerobic ethylbenzene degradation have been described (4, 30, 40).

Three of these organisms, strains EbN1, PbN1 (40), and EB1 (4) were facultative anaerobic denitrifiers; the fourth, strain EbS7, was an obligate anaerobic marine Characterization of anaerobic benzene-degrading cultures book reducer (30).Cited by: Functional characterization of an anaerobic benzene-degrading enrichment culture by DNA stable isotope probing Article in Environmental Microbiology 12(2) October with 42 Reads.

This work studied anaerobic benzene-degrading, nitrate-reducing enrichment cultures that were previously cultivated for over twenty years. Amplicon sequencing of nitrate-reducing cultures amended with benzene and benzene degradation intermediates provided evidence for a process by which Peptococcaceae is responsible for initial substitution of Author: Elisse Magnuson.

Molecular Characterization of Anaerobic Microbial Communities from Benzene-Degrading Sediments under Methanogenic Conditions Article in Biotechnology Progress 21(6). The anaerobic benzene-degrading culture BPL was enriched from soil at a former coal gasification site in Gliwice, Poland, with benzene as growth substrate in the presence of the adsorber resin Amberlite XAD-7 (Morasch et al., ) and 5 mM Na 2 SO 4 as electron acceptor.

The enrichment culture was transferred 15 times with 10% inoculum (v/v Cited by:   Up to now, four anaerobic benzene-degrading bacteria were described; two Dechloromonas strains (RCB and JJ) that degrade benzene coupled with chlorate, perchlorate, nitrate or oxygen reduction (Chakraborty et al., ), and two denitrifying Azoarcus strains (DN11 and AN9) (Kasai et al., ).

The optimal physiological conditions for anaerobic Cited by: like organisms, were phylogenetically most similar to those present in cultures enriched from other benzene-contaminated sites. To link organisms with their potential roles in anaerobic benzene biodegradation, we sequenced, assembled and analyzed the metagenome of one of the benzene-degrading methanogenic : Cheryl E.

Devine. BIOREMEDIATION APPROACHES AND TOOLS FOR BENZENE REMEDIATION UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS Presented by: Sandra Dworatzek, • Aerobic vs anaerobic • Benzene degrading culture DGG-1 • Biomarkers • Biotreatability studies • Cultures for the TEX compounds being tested can beFile Size: 1MB.

Anaerobic benzene oxidation by microbes has been extensively documented in the last decade; however, until now it had only been observed in sediment studies or Cited by: only two anaerobic benzene-degrading strains were iso-lated to purity, which were described as denitrifying members of the genera Dechloromonas and Azoarcus (Coates et al., ; Kasai et al., ).

Despite the cultivation of benzene-degrading cultures, a profound knowledge of the biochemical mechanism and the. The benzene ring moiety is found in biological compounds accounting for ~25% of the land-based organic matter on Earth.

Hence, the biosynthesis and biodegradation of aromatic ring compounds constitutes an important part of natural carbon cycle. Microorganisms capable of using aromatic compounds as carbon and energy sources can be found in a range of very different habitats and redox : Weimin Sun, Valdis Krumins, Donna E.

Fennell, Lee J. Kerkhof, Max M. Häggblom. Benzene is a highly toxic compound. Moreover, benzene-contaminated groundwater is a widespread problem caused mainly by the lack of oxygen in the subsurface. Long-term exposure may cause leukaemia. However, pure cultures of microorganisms with the ability to degrade benzene anaerobically have recently been isolated from novel enrichment cultures.

The novel pure cultures Cited by:   A heterogeneous mixed culture, originally collected from two different sources, namely cow-drug and sludge from the mineral medium containing 1% glucose and then adapted on benzene as the carbon and energy source. Under anaerobic conditions benzene was degraded via benzoic acid as a major intermediate in the benzene degradation pathway.

The degradation rate of benzene was Cited by:   Physiological and molecular characterization of anaerobic benzene-degrading mixed cultures. Environ. Microbiol. – /jx [ PubMed ] [ Cross Ref ]. A bacterial strain for benzene degradation Isolation and Screening of Pseudomonas for Benzene Degradation 10 ml of the sewage water sample taken in test tube and used as a stock.

This sample was then serially diluted from to dilution and plated on a Pseudomonas media (Hi-Media). After confirming the isolated microorganism. The University of Alberta Faculty of Engineering is one of the top engineering schools in Canada.

and E.A. Edwards. Physiological and Molecular Characterization of Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading Mixed Cultures. Environ. Ulrich, A.C., and E.A. Edwards. Molecular Characterization of Anaerobic Consortia Degrading Benzene or.

Characterization of Dechlorinating Populations in the WBC-2 Consortium. 28 June Battelle International Symposium on Bioremediation and Sustainable Technologies, Reno, NV. (Platform) C.E. Devine, R. Gitia-Froz, and E.A. Edwards. Metabolic Pathways, genes and Enzymes in Anaerobic Benzene-Degrading Cultures: From “Omics” to Application.Microbial Approaches for the Enhanced Recovery of Methane and Oil from Mature Reservoirs, p In Wall J, Harwood C, Demain A (ed), Bioenergy.

ASM Press, Washington, DC. doi: /ch30Cited by: 1.Cleaning up benzene contamination. Anaerobic benzene degradation occurs slowly and is a relatively uncharacterized process, and therefore needs further study.

The Edwards lab has cultivated enriched benzene-degrading cultures from a variety of contaminated sites over fifteen years and study the bacterial community and degradation of.